will the third wave please raise her hand?

I’ve written about women a lot.  You probably don’t know it, because i haven’t really done it here.  But check it out.  Not only do I care about “women’s” issues, I also think we have a freaking moral obligation (grounded in my nauseatingly uncertainfaith‘) to ensure the equity of all people.  And i’m probably jaded and stubborn and a little bit blinded by my own perspective, but i pretty much think that as far as we might have come on the equality of women, we’re nowhere even freaking close to where we should be, must be, need to be.  can i get an amen, third-wavers?

Thanks to the New York Times for apparently taking on women’s rights this week.  I don’t know if it was coincidence or planned (I imagine planned), but a lot of columnists spoke about women, something we should all be doing a lot more often.

I think a lot of it has to do with this study (via Judith Warner), which claims that in the past four decades, women’s  self-declared happiness has actually decreased in spite of all the supposed improvements we’ve made.

Maureen Dowd wrote about the gender-based inequities within the Catholic church.  Joanne Lipman spoke about how women’s progress has stalled (what? women still earn only .77 cents to the man’s dollar for the same work?), despite what has been extolled in the recently-released Shriver Report.  And MinnPost reports on the recent debate in England over whether men need to be present in the delivery room (which sounds like a load of hogwash to me).

what is it with the world and women?  in developing countries, women are hit harder by poverty, illness, and social status.  in the developed world women are constantly oversexualized in the media and undercredited at work.  meanwhile, the third wave of feminism (including me) has to insist on being all postmodern, anti-structure, and afraid of making hard and fast statements about what is right, what is wrong, and what is fair. i know i’m not backing this up with any hard facts; i’m just blowing off some steam.  but my question is ultimately this: when is the third wave going to raise her hand, clear her throat, and say precisely: “WTF?!”

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cumin yam stew

i am not, typically, the most creative cook.

when B cooks, he scours our cookbooks, delving through the pages and choosing something challenging and new.

when i cook, i open the fridge and put together ingredients that are often not the most well-paired. NOT SO with this amazing soup i concocted. for reals.

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i know, i know, it doesn’t look at that tasty.  a lot of brown, right?  but hold. your. horses.  this soup has it all: a little bit creamy, a spicy cumin flavor, yam, walnuts, kale, and little white navy beans for protein, it’s nutritious, tasty, hearty, and of course, perfect for FALL.  Read the rest of this entry »


delightful fall

this year in minneapolis (my first fall back in minnesota, after nine years away), september was unseasonably warm, and october unseasonably wet.  there’s been none of that good, crisp, classic autumnal weather.  sometimes, when i’m being a little flexible, i feel as if fall is a time where you breathe deep and know that the dry, crumbled leaf particles are entering your body via your nostrils, slowly imbuing your being with dust, with earth, with chill, with winter, and with solemnity. the cycles of the seasons affect our bodies and our senses, and fall, to me is a grand explosion of harvest, the last push of joy and yearning before a deep and heavy slumber.

Falling leaves pumpkin

Falling leaves pumpkin

an pumpkin ‘lantern’ seemed to me appropriate for fall.  leaves and ghosts and acorns and stars peppered across the gourdy finish, it lends a fairy-like glow to halloween.

IMG_4812 Read the rest of this entry »


pumpkins, goards, and a wedding

Anna and Matthew’s wedding was gorgeous.  Here are a few of my favorite pics from the day.

Approaching the O. Farm

Approaching the O. Farm

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IMG_4658 Read the rest of this entry »


A marriage gift for sustenance

Made from remnants of my fabric stash, and vintage finds from my mom's old stash, I made these napkins to be a set, but not to match

Made from remnants of my fabric stash, and vintage finds from my mom's old stash, I made these napkins to be a set, but not necessarily to match.

A friend from college got married this past weekend, and to celebrate the wedding, I decided to make them a gift that I felt resembled their identity as a couple.  They own a Smart Car, he’s a chef specializing in local foods, and she more than anyone else I knew has taken great steps toward environmental sustainability.  I decided to make them fabric napkins both to honor his vocation and their mutual commitment to a “green life.” When I was finished, I had a hard time giving away the gift that resulted!

Like the napkins, this potholder and all the fabrics used in this project were re-used.

Like the napkins, this potholder and all the fabrics used in this project were recycled.

I used the third component of the package, a picnic placemat, to wrap the gift, eradicating the need for wrapping paper that would eventually be discarded.  The picnic placemat includes a pocket for utensils and a ribbon sewn on the side to package one's lunch, sandwich, or fruit.

I used the third component of the package, a picnic placemat, to wrap the gift, eradicating the need for wrapping paper which would have eventually been discarded. The picnic placemat includes a pocket for utensils and a ribbon sewn on the side to package one's lunch, sandwich, or fruit.

The napkin rings were a fun find at a vintage store.  They're Danish Teak.

The napkin rings were a fun find at a vintage store. They're Danish Teak.


a bone to pick

with my in-between-y theological views (but does anyone have ideas that are not in between something and another?), i’ve often felt ostracized by one group, and then another.  i’ve been told to stop reading the footnotes in a bible study because it will prevent me from gaining access to ‘god’s truth’.  and on the other hand, i’ve been judged for not being extreme enough, not being left enough, very much not being prophetic enough.  most people tend to fall between the extremes, and it is among we middle-grounders that dialogue and compromise is most prevalent.

because of this, a sojourners article caught my eye on my twitter feed that made me consider the middle ground again: caught between two worlds: progressive and evangelical. the author, aaron taylor, speaks about the ostracism he felt while working with a Christian Peacemaker Team in the west bank of palestine, and at first, i was able to relate with his sense of isolation.  the only evangelical of the group, he worked alongside theologically liberal christians for peace, and experienced their questions and probing about why he feels that jesus is the only true way to god.  he questions, “I wonder if we’ve gone too far in laboring to share physical bread with the masses that we’ve neglected to share the “Living Bread” with the masses.” Read the rest of this entry »